Tag Archives: President

Trade and Trump…Story by Isaac Solly

On January 24th, the president officially pulled out of the Trans-Pacific Partnership, ending the ongoing efforts dating back to 2010. TPP aimed to free up tariffs and trade barriers between fourteen Pacific countries, the wealth of which added up to 40% of the world’s GDP. The deal was spearheaded by Obama’s administration, but over the campaign trail Trump rallied against it, citing globalism as a threat to American jobs.

The world’s response has been quick—in a recent Davos conference China’s President Xi Jinping attended and acted as a leader in free trade, stating, “No one will emerge as a winner in a trade war.” Jinping went on to explain how the US abandoned its role as a leader in capitalism, and as such, China was forced into this position.

In fact, an intended effect of TPP was to isolate China economically

Global Trade...The TPP proposed members included Pacific nations, with the noticeable exception of China. Photo by obiter-dicta.ca
Global Trade…The TPP proposed members included Pacific nations, with the noticeable exception of China. Photo by obiter-dicta.ca

from their neighbors. With the collapse of the deal, the reverse is quite possible—Australia cited possible deals with China, and New Zealand still hopes for a deal without US involvement. General diplomacy with the region has not been positive anyway, with a hostile phone call between the Australian Prime Minister and President Trump, and the development of Chinese encroachment on the South China Sea.

The president seems more than willing to use trade as a tool with which to negotiate, as seen with threats of an import tax on Mexican goods based on Mexican retaliation over the proposed wall, raising the possibility of a 20% tariff. This would contradict NAFTA, another

Capitalist China...President Xi Jinping of China speaks at the Davos conference on globalism and free trade. Photo by: www.weforum.org, Valeriano Di Domenico
Capitalist China…President Xi Jinping of China speaks at the Davos conference on globalism and free trade. Photo by: www.weforum.org, Valeriano Di Domenico

trade agreement including Canada, the US, and Mexico. NAFTA was the source of many campaign attacks from President Trump, despite evidence showing negligible economic impact on American workers.

Another example of dealing over trade was seen last week, with the British Prime Minister May’s visit to the US. In the press conference both leaders stressed

the “$1 trillion invested in each other’s economies” and “future economic cooperation and trade.” The meeting set a different tone to a traditionally protectionist President Trump, and shared optimistic views on the speed of such a deal. However, with Britain leaving the European Union’s trade zone and America pulling out of other such agreements, the two countries are likely to embrace bilateral trade.

President Trump’s official website calls for “tough and fair agreements” and does not hold back from threatening US withdrawal on deals such as NAFTA. However, most of the claims are vague and do not inform much—for example, the page says that negotiators will be the “toughest and smartest” yet doesn’t give any names or direct policy. Based on this aggressive approach, it is likely that the President will look for strategies as if they were being directed by a business. Whether this approach will reap benefits is yet to be seen.

Who will be the New Commander-in-Chief?… by Charles Harrison

The presidential elections are coming up on Friday. We have three candidates: Ellie Mearns, Brandon Michelsen, and Savanna Stierle.

More than a book worm... Ellie Mearns is a presidential hopeful this 2015 election.
More than a book worm… Ellie Mearns is a presidential hopeful this 2015 election. Photo-by Charles Harrison

Ellie Mearns, presidential candidate, stated, “The president stands for the student body, council, and school. They are the orchestrator, leader, and main communication point of everything they stand for. So personally, I believe that this person has to be organized and well rounded. This year, we have had a lot of good people running, all qualified for that job; it’s super rad.”

Ellie Mearns also stated that she would be happy to debate the dress code with the school board, and that she wishes for school fundraising to be more in the hands of the students. When asked about her motivation to run, she gave this answer:

“I am so motivated for this council. In the past years, they [the student council] have all had their advantages and disadvantages. So, I would really love to combine all of their past advantages.  Also, student council is such a great experience; I just wish everyone could be council position of choice … I really hope to make this year the best.”

A man of vision... Brandon Michelsen delivers his vision to the student body.
A man of vision… Brandon Michelsen delivers his vision to the student body. Photo-by Charles Harrison

Candidate Brendon Michelsen gave brief, honest answers. When asked about his motivation for running, he answered “I was motivated to run for president because several of my friends recommended I should. Because of their encouragement, I joined this race.” When asked about fundraising, he answered that he did not have a plan and would address that issue later. He did however give some more specific answers. When asked about his plan for the school, he stated, “My main agenda is to re-organize the way we as a student body communicate our ideas to the council. I hope to make it easier for student’s ideas to reach the ears of the representatives and parties involved in the council.”

Willing to lend a hand... Savannah Stierle assists Vice Presidential Candidate in journalism class while during her interview. Photo-by Charles Harrison
Willing to lend a hand… Savannah Stierle assists vice presidential candidate Orion Syth in journalism class during her interview. Photo-by Charles Harrison

Candidate Savannah Stierle has stated that she wished to change dress code, allowing more shirts and reviving hoodies on Fridays. She also said that she would change the lunch program to include more healthy options. For fundraising, she said “…I would like to do fun things such as bake sales, car washes, etc. With these fundraisers, I would like to create bigger and better dances, better supplies for teachers, ect.” She said that she chose to run “Because I feel as if I really hear my fellow students, and I believe I can really make their wants happen.”

Your write-in candidate... Senior Colin Hislop wants to make a difference in the school and brings his previous council experience with him.
Your write-in candidate… Senior Colin Hislop wants to make a difference in the school and brings his previous council experience with him. Photo-by North Idaho College

Presidential Candidate, Colin Hislop, is running as a write-in candidate for president. He is a senior who has served on student council for two consecutive years as a class representative. “I think fundraising is going to be a very important part of the student council’s job, but I would prefer not to release any of my plans until after the election.” He stated that he would not change the lunch program, stating that “changes to the day to day schedules… could cause harm that would outweigh the good,” and that the lunch program was “very solidified.” When asked about his motivation for running, he gave this statement: “My main motivation for running entails the fact that I feel like I would do a good job. I have a lot of past leadership experience, with that I want to help this council grow and benefit the school as a community.”

It is important for everybody to choose a presidential candidate who they believe will represent them, not just the individual person, but also the entire school the best. I invite you to carefully read every response given and make a choice that best suits your beliefs about the school. I also have the complete interview answers; and if requested, I can publish those along with the questions for a more complete picture of the candidates and their stances on the issues. Remember that these are brief summaries of the candidates’ opinions, and I encourage you to walk up to the candidates themselves or talk to them during the Q and A sessions if you want a more detailed answer or have specific questions for the candidates.