Tag Archives: iphone

Cell Phone Addiction… Story by Lydia Martin

Phones: a device that has overtaken the world. A reasonably small object that easily fits in your pocket is controlling our society. When the very first mobile phone was made in 1973, it was used for one thing: to call and talk to someone. Now almost 45 years later, cell phones are used for everything from calling or texting to playing games or solving a math equation. You basically have every book ever written on one note card sized phone.

About 36% of the world’s population owns a phone and about 68% of Americans own a smartphone. Now, I own a phone and in no way am I saying it a bad thing. In fact it can be quite helpful. For example, if you need to contact someone who is at work, or to find information for a project. The problem comes when people abuse the job of the phone or overuse it. When it becomes an addiction. It is going to affect your life, and it will have consequences.

Device is life… It seems that we hardly leave our phone more than a few feet away. Photo by: jetmag.com
Device is life… It seems that we hardly leave our phone more than a few feet away. Photo by: jetmag.com

Here are some statistics about cell phone ownership from psychguides.com:

  • 60% of U.S. college students consider themselves to have a cell phone addiction.
  • 71% of people sleep with or next to their cell phones.
  • Nearly 40% of people never disconnect from cell phones, even while on vacation.
  • 44% of Americans say they couldn’t go a day without their mobile devices.

These statistics are concerning and show that our world revolves around cell phones.

There can be major consequences to having a phone addiction. When I got my first device, an iPod, I told myself this would never happen. Sadly, I didn’t really go through with it. If I was bored the first thing I would do would be to either check Facebook or watch YouTube. I was on my device a lot and I felt is change my family life. This happens to families all around America. Finally I realized I was truly on my device too much and so I made a change. I have realized that having an addition to a phone or other device has consequences.

A Secret Addition… Many students can be secretly on their phones in class. Photo by: Kai Eagley
A Secret Addition… Students secretly on their phones in class. Photo by: Kai Eagley

It appears that some millennials of this world don’t seem to realize this. People divide from family, become afraid to not have their phone, and in some cases, even die because they were staring at their phone and crash or get hit by a car.

Our world needs to realize what is happening to our world and make a change. Yes phones are nice but in no way do we need to be on it all the time. Some changes we can make are: Raise awareness because most people don’t realize they are addicted to their phone. Personally: if you notice you are on your phone a lot, turn it all the way off. Yes that can be hard but it helps. Go do something else to get your mind of your phone and social media. Take a walk, play a board game with someone or read a book. These may seem like small things but over time it will make a difference.

How one iPhone brought Apple and the FBI to court… By Mack Jastle

How one iPhone brought Apple and the FBI to court

By Mack Jastle

After the San Bernadino shooting, many were struck by the sudden violence and savagery of the attack, but grateful that the fighting was over.

Controversy…The debate over whether or not Apple should design a software tool to bypass iOS security protocols for the FBI is still ongoing, and pending a Supreme Court resolution. Photo-by: forbes.com
Controversy…The debate over whether or not Apple should design a software tool to bypass iOS security protocols for the FBI is still ongoing, and pending a Supreme Court resolution. Photo-by: forbes.com

However, in the months following the shooting, a new battle centered on it had entered the public eye.  A battle over one particular iPhone 5C, and the information it may contain.

Since the shooting, the FBI has been in possession of the iPhone 5C owned by Syed Farook (one of the shooters in the San Bernadino shooting).  Within the 24 hours after the shooting, the FBI had retrieved the phone.  In the wake of the rampage, several personnel at the FBI were tasked with resetting the iCloud password to the device.  They believed that by resetting the password, they would be able to access the data stored on the device.

This had the unintended side effect of locking the phone and making all other attempts to crack the encryption useless.  The FBI had just locked itself out of a potential goldmine of information.

“There was a mistake made in the 24 hours after the attack,” James B. Comey Jr, director of the FBI, stated at a hearing on the matter.

With its tail between its legs (and presumably a few early retirements), the FBI approached Apple and asked them to engineer a software that could be uploaded to the iPhone to disable the encryption and security protocols.  Apple refused the request, stating that it was doing so in order to protect the security interests of millions of users worldwide.

The legal battle that has raged since has brought government influence on our technology and user data security back to the forefront of the American consciousness.

“This is not a case about one isolated iPhone,” Mark Zwillinger, an attorney for Apple, wrote.  “Rather, this case is about the Department of Justice and the FBI seeking through the courts a dangerous power that Congress and the American people have withheld: the ability to force companies like Apple to undermine the basic security and privacy interests of hundreds of millions of individuals around the globe.”

The FBI asserts that it is not ordering Apple to create a backdoor into the security protocols, but merely create software to crack the phone.

A court last month ruled that Apple must comply with the FBI’s request, citing the All Writs Act and the US v. New York Telephone court case as past precedent for the ruling.  The FBI asserts that since Apple already codes and writes software as part of its normal business practice, it would not be any significant trouble for them to create the software.

Apple fired back, stating that not only does it not know exactly how to create the software, but they are concerned about the precedent that would be set.

“If Apple can be forced to write code…what is to stop the government from demanding that Apple write code to turn on the microphone in aid of government surveillance, activate the video camera, surreptitiously record conversations, or turn on location services to track the phone’s user?  Nothing,” as stated by Apple’s legal brief.

Innocuous…An iPhone 5C just like this one has brought government espionage and privacy concerns back to the forefront of the American consciousness.
Innocuous…An iPhone 5C just like this one has brought government espionage and privacy concerns back to the forefront of the American consciousness.

This precedent is a very dangerous one, which could allow the government to put tech companies to work on creating surveillance software and backdoors into security protocols.  This would make mass surveillance even easier than it is now, as every person with an iPhone would be carrying a security camera with a built in microphone in their pocket.

This is a scary issue with even scarier implications down the road.  I know I already reference 1984 far too much already, but the parallels are disturbing.  So far the courts have ruled in Apple’s favor, but if the Supreme Court sees fit, they can overrule that and force Apple to comply.

But in the event that Apple IS forced to write the software, at least we have good old Windows phones to rely on.

(I mean, really, who would hack a Windows phone?)