Larsons Department Store… Story by Lydia Martin

Larson’s, a 3 chain department store here in North Idaho, has been around since the 1940s. There are 3 store locations, one in downtown Sandpoint, one in downtown Bonners Ferry and one in downtown Grangeville. The store located in Sandpoint is generally acknowledged as the oldest business in Sandpoint.

Halloween at Larsons… Larsons now manager infront of the Larsons Sandpoint store during Halloween. Photo By: Kai Eagley
Halloween at Larsons… Larsons now manager in front of the Larsons Sandpoint store during Halloween. Photo By: Kai Eagley

Larsons, whose current owner is Dick Larson, started as a partnership store with Jennestad’s store in 1908, located just down the street from the current Larson’s store. Then Dick’s father Lloyd and his uncle Thor bought the J.A Foster & Co. store in 1940, and started their first store.

In 1964, Lloyd then bought out Thor’s share of the store and replaced him with his son Dick. Dick has been working there ever since. In 1970 the Larsons bought the building on First Ave from Jim and Page Parsons. Then in 1978 Lloyd Larson retired and Dick took over as general manager of the store.

In 2000 Dick Larson and his wife Linda bought the old J.C Penny’s store in Bonners Ferry next to the Post Office. After remodeling, they opened the Bonner’s store. In 2010 Dick and Linda purchased the old Miller hardware store in downtown Grangeville, from John and Annelle Urbahn. After another remodeling they opened the third store in October of 2010.

Entrenched Legacy... Larsons Clothing Store is one of the oldest buisnesses in Sandpoint. Photo By: Kai Eagley
Entrenched Legacy… Larsons Clothing Store is one of the oldest buisnesses in Sandpoint. Photo By: Kai Eagley

Currently Larson’s store is doing well, but as with many small clothing stores, its biggest competition is Online shopping, as said by the current manager Lindsey Larson.  Online shopping is a major industry and sometimes it’s a hindrance to small businesses. They have about 10-12 employees in Sandpoint and in all three stores combined about 22-24 employees.

If you’re looking for a job, Larsons loves High school students who come and work for them. Anyone who’s out going, loves clothes and knows how to run a computer.  If you are interested in going to Larsons, make sure to check out one of their three stores.

 

 

 

Holiday Bazaar at FBCS… Story by Aurora Reishus

Date: November 11, 2017

Time: 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Location: Forrest Bird Charter School, High School Building

The Holiday Bazaar, or Economics Craft Fair, was created by Mark Webber, the Economics teacher at Forrest Bird Charter School. Mr. Webber came up with the idea of a craft fair for his Economics class back when he taught at the Mitchell School in Oregon (2008-2010). He reintroduced the idea when he started teaching the Economics class at FBCS seven years ago. For the first three years of the Craft Fair, Mr. Webber was in charge of the event; four years ago the local Sandpoint Farmers’ Market joined the Holiday Bazaar as well.

Products at the fair…A photo showing some of the products that will be at the Bazaar this year. Photo by: Kai Eagley
Products at the fair…A photo showing some of the products that will be at the Bazaar this year. Photo by: Kai Eagley

At the Holiday Bazaar, one will be sure to see a large variety of goods for sale.  Some of the products available this year at the Holiday Bazaar will be: baked goods, musical CD’s, wooden crafts, art, musical instruments, cards, as well as many other goods including home decor products. To find out about all the other products that will be available at this year’s Holiday Bazaar on the 11th of November come to the craft fair at Forrest Bird Charter School.

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Directions:

The location of the Forrest Bird Charter School is 614 S Madison Ave, Sandpoint, ID. To get to the school from the North by Walmart in Ponderay, ID, first head onto Kootenai Cutoff Road and turn left (south) down US-95 S until about a mile and turn onto the Sandpoint exit on the right. At the stop sign turn right to head into the town of Sandpoint. Once in Sandpoint you’ll go through three traffic lights. After the third light you’ll turn west (right) onto Highway 2. Then you’ll see the traffic light on Boyer; go through it and then turn left at the next traffic light onto Division, Once on Division you’ll turn at the green sign that says, “Sandpoint Charter School”.

What street?...A MapQuest image of the school to help you find your way. Photo by: MapQuest

If coming from 210 E Superior Street, turn right (west) onto First Avenue, then take a left onto Lake Street (near Panhandler Pies). After going through a few stop signs turn left onto Euclid and then continue until the T-intersection where you’ll turn right onto Ontario. Stay on Ontario until you turn left onto Division where you’ll head down the road with the green “Sandpoint Charter School” sign. Once at the Charter School location, the high school will be the bigger building on the right.

 

 

Independence Movements in China… Story by Alex Chow

“This world will separate after long time united and vice versa.” This is a famous quote from the Records of the Three Kingdoms—a manuscript from a period in China’s history in around 280 B.C.E. It is an undoubtful truth since various parts of the world, including China, have separated and unified along history. Tibet, Uighur and Mongolia used to be foreign enemies of ancient China, until finally they were conquered after long years of wars. With 56 ethnic groups and over 200 dialects, diversity enriches the Chinese culture, yet it also means a heavy burden to unify the whole country.

When it comes to independence movements, there are many different aspects depending on the culture. Many of the messages contrast with the government’s policy towards “inalienable parts of the country’’.

Most of the people in Hong Kong are Hans—they shared much of their same history with mainland China, yet a seed of western culture germinated. Hong Kong was the colony of the British Empire from 1842 until recently in 1997.

Independent Hong Kong?... Many protesters desire ideas such as democracy and free elections
Independent Hong Kong?… Many protesters desire ideas such as democracy and free elections. Photo By: themalaymail

Notions of democracy, capitalism, and freedom became deeply rooted in the city. However, these ideals are often suppressed under the dictatorship of China. While Hong Kong has ten political parties, there is but a one-party system in the mainland China. The conflicts between Hong Kong and China are inevitable due to these contradicting beliefs.

Much of the desire for independence is because China keeps taking benefits from Hong Kong. For example, around a hundred billion HK$ was spend to build a high-speed railway from Hong Kong to China, a project that mainly benefits mainland China.

An attempt to seek democracy  triggered a wave of independent movements, advocated not only by street protesters, but also by legislative councilors. However, many of the councilors were suppressed by the government, either being unfairly removed or even thrown in jail. As a result, the independent movements lost momentum but were not eradicated.

Some claim that Hong Kong can never become independent because of it’s dependence on the mainland. This is only partially true—China will never say yes to the independence of Hong Kong because of the dignity of being a superpower and the financial role of Hong Kong. Hong Kong would also not be admitted to the United Nations since China is one of the five permanent members who can veto admission. China’s global influence means that Hong Kong would inevitably be isolated, should it desire independence.

Autonomous Regions... China has borderlands with independent cultures. Photo by: Wikipedia
Autonomous Regions… China has borderlands with independent cultures. Photo by: Wikipedia

On the other side of China, Tibet was an independent kingdom for centuries before the Mongol conquest. Afterwards, it fell largely under Chinese influence. It achieved autonomy during the chaos in the Chinese Civil War, before the communist forces took over the mainland. In 1950, the PRC invaded Tibet and defeated the Tibetan forces decisively in the Battle of Chamdo.

After the annexation of Tibet, quality of life was greatly improved in the region, though at the price of tightened control from China. It underwent sinification, a process whereby non-Chinese society come under the influence of Chinese culture, particularly Han Chinese norms. Land collectivization led to famines and riots, all suppressed by violence As a result, the Tibetan political leader Dalai Lama fled to India to establish Tibetan Government in Exile. Meanwhile, Tibet is still under the control of China.

Tibetan as an ethnic minority, they have their unique culture and language. Hence, it makes sense for them to possess some autonomy under the government. Nevertheless, China is not going to agree with the pursuit of the independence as others ethnic minorities may follow this example. China will lose to natural access to numerous natural resources in these areas, as well as Tibet’s strategic importance as a buffer region.

The independence movements are likely to go into a dead end since at no point will China gives up these regions to weaken the strength of the country. Catalonia is a good example of the failure of independent movements, an announcement of independence is nothing but a delusion without international support. Still, it is only a pause but not an end as long as it could be a leverage for asking higher autonomy.